Forestberry herb

Sweetness without sugar

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Latin name: Eucalyptus olida.

One of the most surprising of the native flavours – a gum tree with a sweet, tangy scent.

Eating


  • Adds a sweet, tangy rich scent and flavour to dishes.
  • Leaves can be used fresh or dried. Dried and ground is much more concentrated and sweet.
  • Also excellent in cosmetics such as soaps and potpourri due to the lovely scent.

Growing


  • Is an elegant, fast-growing, gum tree.
  • Does very well in cold temperate regions, as long as water is kept up in the initial planting stage.
  • Frost-tolerant even when young, and grows in heavy clay soils with minimal rain.
  • This is a tree, not a shrub, so not suitable to small yards.
  • You will need to trim it regularly to keep the tree to a size suitable for harvesting the leaves regularly.

Harvesting and storage


  • Use both whole and ground leaves, both fresh and dried.
  • Leaves dry best in a cool, well-aired location. Keep out of direct sun or heat for the best result.
  • If harvesting your own plant, try keeping leaves on pruned branches and placing in a vase with no water. Ensure good airflow around the stems and leaves to prevent mould.
  • The result looks wonderful, and will give out a subtle scent over the next week or so as it gently dries.
  • Leaves can also be dried at low heat in a dehydrator.
  • Leaves can then be easily stripped off the stems and placed in an airtight container for storage.
  • Whole leaves will keep their savour for a good 12 months, if need be.
  • Grind by hand or in a high-powered blender and store in an airtight container.
  • Ground leaves will retain the best scent for about three months.